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60 Please remember to mention OVL when responding to adverts One of the best my father always said when talking about Norman William Bowden his brother- in-law. Norman married my fathers sister Verdie Parrott after they met whilst they both worked on a farm in Warwickshire the county where Norman was born. The couple decided to settle in Oakley where Verdie had grown up. Their only son Howard who is still alive was born in October 1935. Norman worked for his father-in-law Ernest Parrott as a thatchers labourer until he was called up to serve King and country. Norman landed in France on D-Day. He was a Sergeant in 245 Battery of the 62nd Anti Tank Regiment Royal Artillery and was the commander of a 17 pounder Achilles anti-tank gun based on an M10 tank chassis. On 8 July 1944 Norman was southeast of Buron near Caen in France when his tank was engaged in a fierce battle. The War Diary for the day says Sgt Bowdens gun was in position at SE of Buron when the enemy counter- attacked with a considerable number of tanks. Sgt Bowden knocked out at least eight tanks and was mainly responsible for driving off the attack. The success of this gun was due mainly to the coolness and steadiness of Sgt Bowden. Lt Col R B W Bethell recommended Norman for the award of an immediate Military Medal. Lt General John Crocker and Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery countersigned the citation. Over the next three months Normans unit moved up through France and Belgium and into Holland. He used to write home to his wife and son and to his mother talking a lot about home and how he could not wait to get back. Like many others at the time he thought the war would be over by Christmas. On 28 October 1944 his self-propelled gun was in action in a disused brickworks just inside the Dutch border. His gun knocked out another enemy tank and his unit accepted the surrender of eight German soldiers. The War Diary for the day then says a few minutes later one enemy soldier got out of a ditch and waved a white flag and advanced on Sgt Bowdens gun. Almost immediately an armour piercing round struck Sgt Bowdens tank - knocking it out - casualties were Sgt Bowden killed and Gunner Adams lightly wounded. HISTORY One of The Best Gilly Winser Over the next three months Normans unit moved up of a 17 pounder Achilles anti-tank gun based on an M10 tank chassis. On 8 July 1944 Norman was southeast of Buron near Caen in France when his tank was engaged in a fierce battle. The War Diary for the day says Sgt Bowdens gun was in position at SE of Buron when the enemy counter- attacked with a says a few piercing round struck